Posts Tagged ‘tyre pressure variances’

Effects of pressure variances in tyres

Since the day the tyre was invented or more precisely rediscovered as in way the tyre is simply a wheel that has been remodeled to adhere to the modern means of transports. The tyre that is being used today has undergone a lot of changes from the time they were introduced for the first time. The scientific growth aided by technological developments has blended with growing needs of the customer to improve the performances of tyres manifolds.

The following are the areas, which get affected due to pressure variances in the tyres:

 Braking distances
 Fuel economy
 Gripping on the road in normal conditions and on bends
 Wet weather driving conditions

Tyres that are either balding or have been improperly inflated tend to reduce the grip of the wheels on the surface of the roads. The tyres tend to buckle slightly out of shape due to the application of wrong pressure and this may result in the vehicle to become unbalanced and harder braking could lead to tilting of the vehicle to a particular side.

Lower tyre pressures lead to the use of extra force for physically moving the car and this cause more fuel to be burned to keep the car moving. For shorter distances this is not a big issue but incase one is on long drive the prospect of burning more fuel is a nightmare as one has to pay for the petrol and it is a matter of concern.

The gripping of tyres under normal circumstances is greatly reduced due to presence of less air pressure in tyres. The risk is increased in bends as this may escort to deadly penalty. The lack of pressure in tyres causes the tyre to be pushed at a greater angle then they should actually be moving to. The entire scenario is that the area of tread is off the road slightly on one side and bottom of the sidewall is being used as exterior tyre on the supplementary. The loss in grip will considerably reduce the steer of the vehicle.

And finally the wet weather conditions are too harsh and require the tyres to be in perfect condition. Any sort of air pressure variances in the tyres can cause lot of damages. The tyres are provided with tread pattern to move the water away from under the front of the tyre to its sides without it having to go underneath.

If the tyre has water underneath it the surface of the tyre losses contact with the road and this phenomenon is called aquaplaning. Lower air pressures in tyre reduce the effect of treads and the tyres have a greater tendency for to lose grip in wet weather.
Aquaplaning is a severe consequence where the tyre has no grip on the road surface and the minimization of this phenomenon is key to safety. Tyres are provided with treads for negating the effect of aquaplaning but overused tyres or balding tyres tend to have less treads leading to loss of grip in wet road surfaces.